References


  Questions & answers


  A personal note

 

 

You have questions? Here are the answers!

 

What are the possibilities when talking about English or American organs?

Do you also offer your concept for foreign communities?

Which organs can you offer?

Are the organs that you offer in your possession?

Can the organs be viewed in advance?

Which information can you provide about the instruments?

What is so special about English or American organs?

... so where are the weaknesses?

English organs? Those are nothing but dull 8’-stops…

Surely all the transport costs must make this very expensive… What kind of prices are we talking about here?

Let us assume that we would like to start a project. How do we go about it?

What about the guarantee and maintenance? Is there a guarantee for foreign projects as well?

 


  

What are the possibilities when talking about English or American organs?

Basically, there are two possibilities:

1.) A complete restoration

2.) A conversion or a partial new construction using individual components.

For a restoration we are committed to finding a suitable instrument that fits into the new location without great intervention in the substance – technically, architecturally and tonal. A charming example of this is our Steere&Turner project in Köln-Rodenkirchen.

Restructuring projects offer considerably more flexible possibilities. Here, individual parts of the organ are restored and used (e.g. windchest, pipework, bellows) and the rest is finished according to our standards for a new organ construction. This means that we have technical and architectural freedom and can approach a situation in terms of space requirements and design in a similar way as we would with a new construction. To do this, of course only instruments can be used which are not of historical significance.

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Do you also offer your concept for foreign communities?

Yes. Since the transport still keeps the entire costs of an organ project within reasonable limits, we can bring the organs worked on by us pretty much anywhere in the world. Hence we have already brought second-hand organs to Castelnuovo dell’Abate (Italy), Smiltene (Latvia) and Castelo Branco (Portugal).

 

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Which organs can you offer?

The inventory of organs that is available to us fluctuates. Empirically speaking however, at any given time we have around 30-40 instruments available to us from England/Ireland/Scotland alone. Similarly high is the inventory of American organs. The sizes range from small positives with 5 stops to four-manual, concert organs with around 50 stops.

When we receive a request, in all probability we always find a few suitable instruments.

A small selection of available organs can be found here…

 

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Are the organs that you offer in your possession?

No. The organs are still almost exclusively at their own current locations, most of which are in playing condition. That is why there is always a certain amount of fluctuation in our inventory.

 

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Can the organs be viewed in advance?

As a matter of fact, we put a lot of emphasis on viewing the organs in question in advance, together with the community and the supporting organ expert or another neutral person. No one should buy a pig in a poke.

The organ tours are organised by us.

 

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Which information can you provide about the instruments?

It varies. When we receive notice of a newly available instrument, we are initially dependent on the information that we receive from the communities. The extent of the information ranges from just the layout to precise technical drawings.

When someone is interested in an instrument, naturally it will then be thoroughly researched in advance.

 

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What is so special about English or American organs?

As in every epoch, there can be substantial differences between different organ-builders even with instruments built in the same time period. However, organs from the Anglo-American Romantic Epoch are principally characterised by a soft and stable fundamental sound. The crest sound is more or less pronounced, depending on the builder. Contrary to German romantic-style organs, the second manual (swell organ) is much more pronounced.

Technically speaking, the organs are similar to each other insofar as the pedalboard, independent of the manual action technique (mechanical or pneumatic), is usually pneumatically-operated. The reason for that is that the pedal organ is built as an extension to a series (this means that several stops control one rank) and the pipes are distributed to several individual windchests.

In principal it must be said that english instruments are characterised by a solid construction.

 

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... so where are the weaknesses?

The Achilles heel of English organs are the windchests. In many cases, the upper rackboards are glued at a right angle to the direction of the channels and often get damaged and crack over the course of the decades to follow. The result is runners: neighbouring channels having connection.

However we can solve this problem over the long-term, even in climate-sensitive situations. Serving here as an example is our restructured English organ for the Portuguese community in Castelo Branco. It would be our pleasure to personally show you how we do that in our company.

 

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English organs? Those are nothing but dull 8’-stops…

Yes and no. There are in fact a number of two-manual instruments which primarily consist of 8’ stops. However, this is not the rule and depends on the individual builder. Since we always have a larger selection of organs, we can also offer organs with a higher number of stops.

For restructuring, it is also technically possible to simply put on smaller stops. Scaling and intonation are then orientated on authentic models.

 

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Surely all the transport costs must make this very expensive… What kind of prices are we talking about here?

Of course the transportation of an instrument is a logistic expense. Thanks to the fact that we can revive most instruments at a very low purchase price, even with a partial new construction, the prices only amount to about half the price of a new construction.

 

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Let us assume that we would like to start a project. How do we go about it?

The basic approach is as follows:

After your request we will visit you and discuss the requirements during an on-site visit..

We will give you an overview of the instruments in question from our inventory, along with some initial information.

Together with you and possibly participating organ experts, 2-3 organs are filtered out.

We take care of obtaining more detailed information about these organs and will create a first estimate with a first budget including a first technical drawing.

Then it gets serious: We organise an organ tour to the selected instruments in order to examine them together. The organ tours are organised by us.

After that an organ is selected for which we then create a final offer with binding drawings and suggestions for the design of the leaflets.

Finally, you decide on the implementation of the project.

 

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What about the guarantee and maintenance? Is there a guarantee for foreign projects as well?

For restructured instruments, we basically give our new construction guarantee of 15 years – even for restored components.

For restored organs, depending on the extent of the restoration, we also give up to a 15 year guarantee!

For organs in other countries, we search for local organ-builders as cooperation partners. The requirement of the guarantee is regular maintenance, which is carried out every 2-3 years by us. The prices for this are agreed upon in advance in order to give you the control over the upcoming costs.

 

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